BREAKING: Dems DEMOLISHED In Monumental Fight Over God-Given Right – HELL YEAH!

Southern Democrats are feeling demolished after they just lost a significant vote that will effectively save lives right away. Democrats were against this, but the House voted 75-34 in favor of saving lives, and the Mississippi Republican lawmakers just got a major victory in what could become America’s most restrictive abortion law.

Image may contain: 6 people, people smiling, people standing, suit and text

Southern Democrats are feeling demolished after they just lost a significant vote that will effectively save lives right away. Democrats were against this, but the House voted 75-34 in favor of saving lives, and the Mississippi Republican lawmakers just got a major victory in what could become America’s most restrictive abortion law.

The new law, which Democrats tried stopping, bans abortions after the 15th week of pregnancy. That means any woman who is just over three months pregnant will be forbidden from getting an abortion. This will be controversial in nature as the leftists claim it is “their body, their right” and most people with common sense will state that anyone who is 15 weeks pregnant should have already decided if they want to keep or kill their baby. Any requested abortion after 15 weeks will be rejected in Mississippi, except there are certain circumstances that will be defined. Those might incur any abortion that is required to save the mother’s life if an emergency situation happens and doctors need to make a fast decision. Another situation could be something that will prevent the child from living outside of the womb. The bill, for some reason, does not include victims of rape or incest – but it absolutely should as any woman raped should not be forced to carry the child of the person who attacked her.

Democrats expect to push back against Republicans who fought for the God-given right to live.

NBC News reports more about the controversial law that upset Democrats:
“The owner of Mississipi’s only abortion clinic has said she’ll sue if the bill goes into law — a move lawmakers not only know to expect, but seem to be encouraging, in hopes of eventually getting the nation’s highest court to revisit its rulings and allow states to begin restricting abortion earlier in pregnancy.

“It seems like a pretty simple bill designed to test the viability line that the Supreme Court has drawn,” said David Forte, a law professor at Ohio’s Cleveland State University.

There are two exceptions to House Bill 1510: if the fetus has a health problem that would prevent it from surviving outside the womb at full term, or if the pregnant woman’s life or a “major bodily function” is threatened by the pregnancy. Pregnancies as a result of rape and incest are not exempt.

A number of states, including Mississippi, have already tiptoed up to the viability line with 20-week bans, although the U.S. Senate earlier this year rejected such a ban nationwide when supporters couldn’t reach a 60-vote supermajority to act.

An appeals court in 2015 struck down efforts in North Dakota to ban most abortions after six weeks, when a fetus develops a detectable heartbeat, and in Arkansas after 12 weeks. Abortion rights supporters are dubious that the outcome in Mississippi would be any different.

“The Supreme Court has said and resaid again and again that states cannot prohibit women from obtaining abortions prior to viability, which is what a 15-week ban would do,” said Hillary Schneller, staff attorney for the Center for Reproductive Rights. The New York-based group, which advocates for free access to abortion, called the bill unconstitutional and “medically unsound.”

Mississippi’s own 20-week ban has never been legally challenged, in part because the state’s only abortion clinic, the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, doesn’t perform abortions that late in pregnancy. According to state Department of Health statistics, 85 percent of abortions in Mississippi took place before 12 weeks in 2016.

But Diane Derzis, who owns the clinic, has said the clinic does provide abortions until about 18 weeks after pregnancy. Most of Mississippi’s 2,500 abortions in 2015 took place at the clinic”

The only striking part of this bill that caused some Republicans to question the situation was that rape and incest victims might not be protected after 15 weeks. However, that shouldn’t be much of a problem as doctors will likely see rape and incest victims before 15 weeks and make their ultimate decision, if needed, at that point.

Democrats will potentially take this to court and try to reverse the decision. The “my body, my choice” movement will fight back, but the opposing side will remind them that they should decide before 15 weeks – otherwise, they’re essentially killing a child.

This bill will save lives, not ruin them. Democrat pushback is expected but should be easily defeated. Saving lives of unborn children should be more important than taking their lives away when they’re  already half developed and on their way to being born

The new law, which Democrats tried stopping, bans abortions after the 15th week of pregnancy. That means any woman who is just over three months pregnant will be forbidden from getting an abortion. This will be controversial in nature as the leftists claim it is “their body, their right” and most people with common sense will state that anyone who is 15 weeks pregnant should have already decided if they want to keep or kill their baby. Any requested abortion after 15 weeks will be rejected in Mississippi, except there are certain circumstances that will be defined. Those might incur any abortion that is required to save the mother’s life if an emergency situation happens and doctors need to make a fast decision. Another situation could be something that will prevent the child from living outside of the womb. The bill, for some reason, does not include victims of rape or incest – but it absolutely should as any woman raped should not be forced to carry the child of the person who attacked her.

 

Democrats expect to push back against Republicans who fought for the God-given right to live.

NBC News reports more about the controversial law that upset Democrats:
“The owner of Mississipi’s only abortion clinic has said she’ll sue if the bill goes into law — a move lawmakers not only know to expect, but seem to be encouraging, in hopes of eventually getting the nation’s highest court to revisit its rulings and allow states to begin restricting abortion earlier in pregnancy.

“It seems like a pretty simple bill designed to test the viability line that the Supreme Court has drawn,” said David Forte, a law professor at Ohio’s Cleveland State University.

There are two exceptions to House Bill 1510: if the fetus has a health problem that would prevent it from surviving outside the womb at full term, or if the pregnant woman’s life or a “major bodily function” is threatened by the pregnancy. Pregnancies as a result of rape and incest are not exempt.

A number of states, including Mississippi, have already tiptoed up to the viability line with 20-week bans, although the U.S. Senate earlier this year rejected such a ban nationwide when supporters couldn’t reach a 60-vote supermajority to act.

An appeals court in 2015 struck down efforts in North Dakota to ban most abortions after six weeks, when a fetus develops a detectable heartbeat, and in Arkansas after 12 weeks. Abortion rights supporters are dubious that the outcome in Mississippi would be any different.

“The Supreme Court has said and resaid again and again that states cannot prohibit women from obtaining abortions prior to viability, which is what a 15-week ban would do,” said Hillary Schneller, staff attorney for the Center for Reproductive Rights. The New York-based group, which advocates for free access to abortion, called the bill unconstitutional and “medically unsound.”

Mississippi’s own 20-week ban has never been legally challenged, in part because the state’s only abortion clinic, the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, doesn’t perform abortions that late in pregnancy. According to state Department of Health statistics, 85 percent of abortions in Mississippi took place before 12 weeks in 2016.

But Diane Derzis, who owns the clinic, has said the clinic does provide abortions until about 18 weeks after pregnancy. Most of Mississippi’s 2,500 abortions in 2015 took place at the clinic”

The only striking part of this bill that caused some Republicans to question the situation was that rape and incest victims might not be protected after 15 weeks. However, that shouldn’t be much of a problem as doctors will likely see rape and incest victims before 15 weeks and make their ultimate decision, if needed, at that point.

Democrats will potentially take this to court and try to reverse the decision. The “my body, my choice” movement will fight back, but the opposing side will remind them that they should decide before 15 weeks – otherwise, they’re essentially killing a child.

This bill will save lives, not ruin them. Democrat pushback is expected but should be easily defeated. Saving lives of unborn children should be more important than taking their lives away when they’re  already half developed and on their way to being born.